HookedinFishing » Can You Fish With Two Rods? Each State Answered

Can You Fish With Two Rods? Each State Answered

Fishing with multiple rods is a great way to quickly switch between lures without having to tie them on each time. You also can use multiple rods to have multiple baits in the water at a time which gives you more opportunities to catch fish faster.

In the United States, it is legal to use two fishing rods at a time in all states except Tennessee, Minnesota, and Georgie. Some bodies of water may have restrictions of their own.

Is Fishing With 2 Rods Legal By State

StateCan You Fish With Two Rods
AlabamaThere is no limit on the number of fishing rods you use in Alabama. Neely Henry and Weiss lakes do have a limit of 3 rods.
AlaskaIn Alaska, you are limited to 3 rods when ice fishing and 1 rod when fishing with a reel.
ArizonaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Arizona.
ArkansasIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Arkansas.
CaliforniaIn California, you can use 2 rods if you purchase a second-rod validation.
ColoradoIn Colorado, you can use 2 rods if you purchase an additional rod stamp.
ConnecticutIn Connecticut, you can use up to 3 fishing rods.
DelawareIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Delaware.
FloridaThere is no limit on the number of fishing rods you use in Florida.
GeorgiaIn Georgia, it is only legal to use 1 fishing rod.
HawaiiIn Hawaii, you can use 2 rods but some bays have restrictions. Check for restrictions in the area you will be fishing.
IdahoIn Idaho, you can use 2 rods if you purchase a two-pole permit.
IllinoisIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Illinois.
IndianaThere is no limit on the number of fishing rods you use in Indiana.
IowaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Iowa.
KansasIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Kansas.
KentuckyThere is no limit on the number of fishing rods you use in Kentucky.
LouisianaThere is no limit on the number of fishing rods you use in Louisiana.
MaineIn Maine, you can fish with 2 rods when the water isn’t frozen. You can use up to 5 rods when ice fishing.
MarylandIn Maryland, you can fish with up to 3 rods.
MassachusettsIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Massachusetts.
MichiganIn Michigan, you can use 2 rods but some bodies of water have restrictions. Check for restrictions in the body of water you will be fishing.
MinnesotaIn Minnesota, you are limited to only 1 fishing rod when the water wasn’t frozen.
MississippiIn Mississippi, you can fish with up to 5 rods.
MissouriIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Missouri.
MontanaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Montana.
NebraskaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Nebraska.
NevadaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Nevada.
New HampshireIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in New Hampshire.
New JerseyIn Mississippi, you can fish with up to 3 rods.
New MexicoIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in New Mexico.
New YorkIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in New York.
North CarolinaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in North Carolina.
North DakotaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in North Dakota.
OhioIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Ohio.
OklahomaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Oklahoma.
OregonIn Oregon, you can use 2 rods if you purchase a two-rod validation.
PennsylvaniaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Pennsylvania.
Rhode IslandIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Rhode Island.
South CarolinaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in South Carolina.
South DakotaIn South Dakota, You can only use 1-rod unfrozen water. You can fish with up to 4 rods when ice fishing.
TennesseeIn Tennessee, you can only use 1 rod at a time. It is illegal to fish with more than 1 rod.
TexasIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Texas.
UtahIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Utah.
VermontIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Vermont.
VirginiaIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Virginia.
WashingtonIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Washington. Some bodies of water may have restrictions.
West VirginiaWest Virginia allows you to fish with up to 2 fishing rods.
WisconsinIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Wisconsin.
WyomingIt is legal to fish with 2 rods in Wyoming.

Last Updated: 4/25/2022

Note: State laws are subject to change through the passage of new legislation, ballot initiatives, rulings in courts, and other means. While we strive to provide the most up to date information available, please consult a lawyer or verify the state law(s) you are researching.